The Historic Green Street Church Museum

(CLICK FOR LARGER VIEW)

Help Move and Save Englewood’s Iconic First Church!

(See Historic Timeline Below)

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Mail your tax-deductible donation to:

Lemon Bay Historical Society
P. O. Box 1245
Englewood FL 34295

Thank you!

We are a 100% volunteer Florida-based charitable not-for-profit 501 (c)(3) corporation (REGISTRATION NO. CH49480). A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE (FloridaConsumerHelp.com). REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.

On behalf of the Society, many thanks to all of you who donated to Charlie Hicks’ run to be “Mayor for a Day.” The grand total is $2784 which will be added to the amount raised to move our historic building. Thanks again to all who contributed and congratulations to Charlie!!

Although the Lemon Bay Historical Society owns this historic building, the land it sits on is leased. The “99 year lease” has to be renewed every 10 years will expire in May, 2018. The Society has been informed that the lease will not be renewed. The Society offered to buy the land but the owner has declined the offer. In addition, parking space has always been a problem at the current site.  
In order to save this historic building, to ensure problem-free parking and access for community events, the Historical Society has elected to move the building to a lot it will own on the south side of the Lemon Bay Cemetery. This new location is more appropriate as an historical setting as is is adjacent to the burying ground of many of Englewood’s pioneer families.
Your help is needed to raise funds to provide a “forever home” for the Lemon Bay Historical Society and for this iconic community building. We are pleased to announce that already local businesses are donating money, time and materials to help move and save the building. Your support will be greatly appreciated; no amount is too small or too large.  

 

DOWNLOAD PRINTABLE FORM TO BECOME A MEMBER

The church museum is a designated Sarasota County Historical Building.

The Historic Church Museum is available to rent for weddings and other events.
For info, contact Terry Zic
PHONE: 941-740-4510
EMAIL: TerryZ12@comcast.net

 


Historic Green Street Church Timeline

1890? – The following document (courtesy Florida State Library & Archives, written in 1939) states the Englewood Methodist Church was “constituted c. 1890.”  This is hard to believe as the Nichols brothers didn’t name the town until 1896! (Click for larger view.)

(Courtesy Florida State Archives)

1905 – Englewood Methodists began holding Sunday School classes in Josie Quimby Miller’s home.

1914 – Rev. Joseph Barton organized the first Methodist class with 10 charter members: Mrs. E. Emerson, Sarah Buchan Kelley, Mrs. J. D. Kinney, Miss M. Kinney, Nellie Anger Lampp, Edith Anger Lampp, Josie Quimby Miller, Annie Roberts, Fabian Robrts and Mr. Roberts.

1921 – Led by visiting preachers, Methodist Episcopal met at the school house (on today’s Old Englewood Road) and for a short period at Sarah Buchan Kelley’s.

Lemon Bay Woman's Club

Lemon Bay Woman’s Club

1926 – The first gathering of the Community Church was at the Lemon Bay Woman’s Club. The Methodist Episcopal group broke away and had their own service the following Wednesday at the school house at the corner of Dearborn and Elm.

1928 – Rev. Hubert Dodd, 4 daughters and his wife brought a piano from Georgia. She gave Lottie Lampp lessons. 

April 5, 1928 – Under the direction of Rev Dodd, Burt Anger and Pat Lampp the group was able to build a simple frame structure on two lots at the corner of Green and Magnolia Streets. The land was donated by Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lampp and the Florida Methodist Conference Board of Missions. Built by ship builders, the new church cost $1,250. The bell placed in the bell tower came from the Nokomis Methodist Church which was destroyed in the 1926 hurricane.

Englewood Methodist Church 1920s (Courtesy Florida State Archives)

Lottie Alma Lampp

1929 – When the Florida Land Boom collapsed, Englewood was hard hit. The church struggled. Lottie Lampp (Stanley’s niece) is credited with holding the small congregation together. Lottie Lampp:

— cleaned the church

— provided flowers from her garden for services

— played the piano when needed

— sold flowers and baked goods on Dearborn to raise $5 to pay the minister

— arranged for a Baptist minister and cornetist from Venice, Roy Gustafson, to call the worshippers together. 

It was the sound of the minister’s cornet that brought fishing parties in from the bay to attend church.

1944 – A hurricane damaged the original bell tower and it was replaced with a bell tower on top of the building.

1953 – The congregation was financially strong enough to support a permanent pastor, the Rev. Edgar E. Stauffer, at an annual salary of $2,500. A new parsonage was built on the N/E corner of Green and Magnolia Streets. Three lots were purchased west of the church, a fellowship hall was added on the back of the church. A porch and columns were added on the front of the building.

1956 photo showing fellowship hall addition, columns in front and bell tower atop roof center

The congregation enlarged the facilities and replaced the original slat benches with pews. A widened front door that could accommodate a casket enabled the church to be used for funeral services.

1958 – A new facade was added to the front, then the bell tower in the middle of the roof was removed.

The columns are gone to make way for a new facade. In the top photo the Fellowship Hall addition can still be seen on the left.

1962 – The growing congregation broke ground for a new larger sanctuary next door. The original building was moved to the western side of the property and turned to face Green Street. It was redesigned and named the Lampp Youth Center in recognition of the contributions made to the church by the Lampp family.

1979 – The Methodists needed an even larger church and moved 2 miles out to their current location on the corner of Pine and Dearborn. The 1962 Magnolia Street and the 1928 Green Street buildings were purchased by The Church of the Nazarene.

1988 – When renovation plans were announced, the Lemon Bay Historical Society became concerned that such work might threaten the historical integrity of the building. After some negotiations, the Church of the Nazarene transferred ownership of the building to the Society but with a 99-year lease on the land under the church, renewable every 10 years.

Historical Society’s Bill Davis with the Church prior to renovation

The Historical Society then began the slow process of restoring the building and returning it to its original 1920s design, including replacing the bell tower.

1997 – Through the generosity of area pioneers L.A. Anger, Dorothy Cannon, J.D. “Jack” Tate, and the Helen Vanderbilt Trust, who each contributed enough to match a State grant for $19,400, restoration of the interior began.

 

Historical Society Folks Repairing the Roof

1998 – The Historical Society received a certificate of occupancy from Sarasota County and on March 21, the first wedding in the restored church museum was held.

2005 – The 1928 church building was recognized by the Sarasota County Register of Historic Places. 

2013 – Members of the Historical Society complete needed repairs to the roof. 

 




In 2014 the Englewood Methodist Church (founded in 1914) celebrated 100 years:


The Church Museum is available to rent for weddings and other events.
For info, contact Terry Zic
PHONE: 941-740-4510
EMAIL: TerryZ12@comcast.net

Card by Lise Yust.

 


TEXT FROM THE SARASOTA COUNTY HISTORIC MARKER:

Green Street Church and Museum

​416 W. Green Street, Englewood, FL

The Green Street Church Museum began as Englewood’s first church building. Community Methodists began holding Sunday School classes in Josie Quimby Miller’s home around 1905. After the church officially organized in 1914, services were held in temporary locations and were led by visiting preachers.

With funding from a variety of sources, including Stanley Lampp and the Florida Methodist Conference Board of Missions, the group was able to build a simple frame structure without incurring any debt. The members first worshipped in their Magnolia Street church home on April 5, 1928.

When the 1920s Land Boom collapsed, Englewood was hard hit. The church struggled. Lottie Lampp (Stanley’s niece) is credited with holding the small congregation together. She cleaned the church, provided flowers from her garden for services, and played the piano when needed. Through her efforts a Baptist minister and cornetist from Venice, Roy Gustafson, called the worshippers together. The sound of the cornet brought fishing parties in from the bay. Women held bake sales to raise the $5 to pay the minister.

By 1952 the congregation was financially strong enough to support a permanent pastor, the Rev. Edgar E. Stauffer, at an annual salary of $2,500. The following year the congregation enlarged the facilities and replaced the original slat benches with pews. A widened front door that could accommodate a casket enabled the church to be used for funeral services.

The congregation broke ground for a new sanctuary in 1962 and the original building was moved to the western side of the property and turned to face Green Street. It was redesigned and named the Lampp Youth Center in recognition of the contributions made to the church by the Lampp family. In 1979 the Methodists moved to a new location.

The Church of the Nazarene purchased the Green Street church in 1979. When renovation plans were announced, the Lemon Bay Historical Society became concerned that such work might threaten the historical integrity of the building. After some negotiations, the Church of the Nazarene gave the building to the Historical Society with a 99-year lease on the land for $1 per year. Upon completion of needed restoration work in 1992, the Society turned the church into a museum.

Dedicated in 2005 by the Sarasota County Historical Commission.